Le Cordon Bleu London – Gateau au Citron & Madeleines

Thursday’s practical was surprisingly relaxing and not too hard compared to some of the practicals we’ve previously had. Chef’s demo started off with a Gateau au Citron (Lemon pound cake), Madeleines, then the Gênes à la Pistache (traditional almond and pistachio cake). I was a bit disappointed to find out that the gateau au citron was actually a pound cake! Not very french…

pistachio cake madeleines Chef’s creations sliced up for us to try 🙂 The madeleines were soft and buttery, fresh out of the oven. The texture of the pistachio almond cake was very light and fluffy. However, the cake had more of an almond flavour and barely any pistachio flavour which was disappointing since I love everything pistachio flavoured!  gateau au citron cut Above: chef’s gateau au citron sliced up.

During the demo we learnt that there are three ways that cakes can rise:
Mechanically – manually whipping and incorporating air, for example airating egg whites.
Biologically – using yeast
Chemically – rising agents such as baking powder.

Gateau au Citron gateau au citron le cordon bleu

The Gateau au Citron uses a chemical method (baking power), as well as steam released from the water in the butter and eggs to allow the cake to rise. Gateau au citron, aka pound cake actually originated in the UK and weighed a pound…according to chef.

The Gateau au Citron is composed of 3 parts: The cake itself, the lemon julienne garnish and the glaçage.

Everything was pretty straightforward and everything went well. Except for one thing… My excess parchment paper stuck onto the top of cake while baking!! Apparently, this happened to a lot of the students during the practical. So don’t forget to trim the top of the parchment down so it’s not too tall because once it goes in the convection oven, the paper will flap around and stick onto the cake batter. This caused a slight indentation on the surface of the cake. You can see where the paper got stuck on the right side of the cake 🙁 gateau au citron

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Le Cordon Bleu London – Basic Patisserie

le cordon bleu london entrance

le cordon bleu london entrance

Basic Patisserie at Le Cordon Bleu London

Last month, I was accepted into Le Cordon Bleu London’s basic patisserie course. I’ve been waiting impatiently for classes to start and it’s finally orientation day tomorrow!! I’m really excited and equally as nervous for classes to start. I’m looking forward to learning the fundamentals, mastering some french patisserie skills and meeting the other students. I’ve also heard that pastry school is very tough. It’s tiring, it’s fast paced and it’s stressful. There are also a few things that I’m really not looking forward to. Namely:

  1. Wearing ugly unisex kitchen shoes
  2. Hair nets. In primary school we used to make fun of the dinner ladies and their hair nets. Now I’m going to be one of them.
  3. Punctuality.  Ask any of my friends, punctuality is definitely NOT one of my fortes. At all. Apparently, If you’re 5 minutes late you can’t go in the class to watch the demo and you can’t do the practical. And if you’re late 5 times you get taken out of the course!!
  4. The Exams. I heard that you need to memorise all the recipes (And there are lots of recipes!) for the exams. I honestly think I have early Alzheimers. Tell me something and I’ll forget a minute later!
  5. Speed. We’ll be given a strict time limit in the practicals and exams so everybody needs to be relatively quick. I’m like a snail in the kitchen. My parents and boyfriend have probably almost starved to death waiting for me to finish cooking or baking!
  6. How fat I’m going to get because of the amount of sweets and pastries I’m going to be scoffing down.

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Profiteroles with ice cream and hot chocolate sauce

profiteroles

profiteroles with ice cream and hot chocolate sauce
The other day my boyfriend and I were at our local supermarket and he picked up a little box of profiteroles to put in the basket. I thought, why don’t I try making them for us instead?! When I told him he gave me the, er, I don’t think that’s such a good idea face. But what’s the worse that could happen, I thought? If it doesn’t work I’ll just come back and buy some soggy store bought profiteroles.

I always assumed that profiteroles were really hard to make. I’m not completely sure why, since I originally had no idea how to make them. I just assumed that something so delicate and delicious must be hard to make. But I thought I’d challenge myself anyway and try to make something new. Turns out, they were really easy to make and a complete hit with everyone!

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